Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research (AISSR)

Urban Geographies (UG)

Human Geography, Planning and International Development Studies

Crucial urban transformations and current debates on interrelated social, cultural and economic issues in cities and metropolitan areas form the backdrop for this research. The aim of the Urban Geographies programme group is, first of all, to gain better understanding of the diverse and complex mutual relationships between the development of urban spaces and places, time-space behaviour, individual life courses and life chances. Although interesting research topics in themselves, the shared connections between these phenomena are crucial and therefore form the central focus of this programme. Researchers focus on the way spaces and places are affecting social behaviour and social opportunities, as well as how social behaviour and social interactions are creating and reshaping spaces and places.

Three increasingly interrelated issues form the core of the current programme, namely:

  1. New urban dynamics and the emergence of new cities. New trajectories in urbanisation and suburbanisation fall under this framework. In addition, attention is given to the emergence of new city concepts and related discourses such as the knowledge city, the cultural city and the creative city.
  2. Life courses and time-space behaviour. Key questions in this framework relate to the consequences of continuing individualisation for daily and lifetime trajectories in time and space.
  3. Spatial inequalities, segregation, integration and neighbourhood effects. This framework focuses on major theoretical, societal and methodological issues relating to the development and interlinkages of social and cultural spatial configurations as well as the effects of spatial inequalities on life chances of specific populations.

This programme group's research mission is to have a significant role in international and national scientific and societal debates regarding the mutual relations between developments in and of urban spaces and places as well as social and spatial behaviour and life opportunities.

Published by  AISSR

11 March 2013