Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research (AISSR)

Horizons and Chronicity

27Mar2018 28Mar2018


This workshop brings together researchers dealing with the entanglement of space and time, with a focus on urban temporalities. It draws attention to the notion of ‘horizons’, aptly referring to both the spatial and the temporal, allowing to resonate with research across disciplines.

This workshop is a two-day-long, multidisciplinary event during which Prof. Dr. Laura Bear and Dr. Felix Ringel, two scholars working on issues around temporality and space, will lead conversations and meet with researchers at the UvA. The workshop will focus on understandings of horizons and the merging of past, present, and future temporalities with the urban. An emphasis will be put on linking participants’ research projects to questions of urban temporality through group discussions.


Time is a topic that Laura Bear has examined in a number of collaborations. She was the director of the ESRC-funded research network, Conflicts in Time. This led to her editorship of a volume on Conflict, Doubt, Mediation: the Anthropology of Modern Time. Currently she is writing a book that examines contemporary forms of labour in/and of time. 

Felix Ringel is particularly interested in how people in mid-sized postindustrial cities envision the future, in light of the issues surrounding climate change and urban sustainability. He pays particular attention to the ways that people conceptualise their present situation in light of the future. He is the co-editor of a special issue of the Cambridge Journal of Anthropology on Time Tricking.


UvA Anthropology Common Room & Lloyd Hotel.

Organization and admission

A maximum of twelve participants will be admitted to the workshop, as time will be devoted to discussing each participants' current research in relation to the workshop’s themes. Please contact Alana Osbourne for more information. To participate, send a short bio and abstract on your research.

This workshop is organised by Alana Osbourne and is funded by a Centre for Urban Studies Seed Grant. 

Published by  CUS