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The AISSR is organizing a series of online roundtable discussions about research in times of Covid. The roundtable discussions will help PhD researchers find creative ways forward in challenging times. In this first roundtable discussion we will hear from researchers who have made Covid-19 and its societal impact topic of their research. Social scientific knowledge is indispensable in understanding and responding to the crisis. Researchers from the AISSR started several new projects focusing on the (social) impact of Corona on political trust, social communities and the urban environment.

Event details of Roundtable 1: Researching (during) Covid-19
Date 19 February 2021
Time 13:00 -14:30

Due to the Covid crisis and related lockdowns, PhD researchers and other early career scholars are facing considerable delays and disruptions to their research. The AISSR invites all researchers to the new seminar series on Research in Times of Covid-19. The aim of these seminars is to share best-practice examples within the AISSR community, and to create a platform for questions, exchanges, and mutual support for PhDs and AISSR staff more generally.

During the series, we will discuss the impact of Covid on different research projects and learn from colleagues on how they have dealt with this impact practically. We invite researchers to share examples of new ways of fieldwork, adapted research design, moving research online, and studying the societal impact of Covid. The roundtable discussions will help PhD researchers find creative ways forward in challenging times.

In this first roundtable discussion in the AISSR series on Research in Times of Covid-19 we will hear from researchers who have made Covid-19 and its societal impact topic of their research. Social scientific knowledge is indispensable in understanding and responding to the crisis. Researchers from the AISSR started several new projects focusing on the (social) impact of Corona on political trust, social communities and the urban environment. We invite these researchers to share their projects and experiences, including tips and suggestions for others.

Some questions that we will ask during this session:

  • What role for social scientists in studying the impact of Covid? What can social scientists contribute to manage these social problems?
  • How can we reveal the social consequences of the lockdown?
  • How to do research keeping in mind Covid-restrictions such as working from home and limited or no ability to travel? What methods did you use? How did you cooperate with stakeholders?

Speakers

Christian Bröer is associate professor of sociology, leading a number of research projects and educational teams. When the virus hit, Christian was already working on a long-running ethnographic panel study of parents with young children, and decided to collect extra data about young families coping with Covid-19 threads and restrictions. Read more about the project here.

Eefje Steenvoorden is assistant professor at the Department of Political Science. She studies and teaches social divisions in public opinion and political behavior, and specializes in political trust and societal pessimism. Eefje and colleagues had just planned a survey about trust in politics. This was disrupted by the sudden outbreak of Covid-19, but at the same time the crisis gave the project a new meaning. The researchers thus accidentally had extensive information about political confidence in the week before the closure of the schools and the speech of the Prime Minister. Read more here.

Willy Sier is postdoc at the Anthropology department at the Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas programme group. The Chinese city of Wuhan is now world famous for the outbreak of the corona virus. But researcher and China expert Willy Sier has been coming to China since 2005 and did her PhD research in Wuhan. She got a new grant to study life after lockdown and has conducted research using participatory visual methods in Wuhan. Read more here and here.

Fenne Pinkster is associate professor of Urban Geography at the department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies. She has just started a collaborative research project with the municipality of Amsterdam to study how Amsterdammers have experienced social distancing and staying at home in the city during the ‘smart lockdown’ period. Read more here.

Marieke de Goede is academic director of the AISSR and Professor of Politics, with a focus on 'Europe in a Global Order,' at the Department of Politics of the University of Amsterdam.

Register

The event will take place on Zoom. After the contributions by the speakers, there will be ample time for Q&A.

After the event, we will host an informal aftertalk with all interested staff and PhD students from 14:30 onwards. 

Please register below, and we will send you the Zoom-link one day in advance. 

The next seminars will address the following themes:

  • Fieldwork in times of Covid
  • Digital methods and online tools/ platforms
  • The future of academic work

Keep an eye on our website and Twitter for updates.