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Both Rwandan and Indonesian modern history were characterized by a series of violent conflicts. The most violent episode in Indonesian history was the 1965-1968 genocide while in Rwandan history it was the 1994 genocide. This symposium will explore in a comparative way what the legacies are of both genocides as experienced by descendants of the generation that consciously lived through the respective genocide episodes - as victim, perpetrator or bystander - and the way these descendants cope with these legacies.

Detail Summary
Date 12 June 2018
Time 10:00 - 17:00
Location Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)

Background information

During the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda approximately one million people were killed, two million fled to neighbouring countries and one million were internally displaced. During the genocide against alleged members of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in Indonesia possibly one million people were killed and perhaps another million and a half were detained without trial. Many more suffered from other kinds of injustices. In Rwanda a range of transitional justice mechanisms were implemented by the government soon after the genocide – the main ones being the community justice courts Gacaca, a national reconciliation program, memorials at massacre sites and annual commemorations, while the Indonesian government silenced the genocide, granted impunity to the perpetrators and obstructed any form of memorialisation. These differences at least partly explain why in the genocide studies canon the Rwandan genocide features high on the list in terms of attention while the Indonesian genocide features low on that list.

This symposium will explore in a comparative way what the legacies are of both genocides as experienced by descendants of the generation that consciously lived through the respective genocide episodes - as victim, perpetrator or bystander - and the way these descendants cope with these legacies. One of the aims of the symposium is to generate inspiration for a research proposal focusing on genocide-related intergenerational issues in Indonesia.

Programme

10.00 - 10.30

Registration

 

10.30 - 10.40

Welcome

Annemiek Richters

10.40 – 11.15

Bert Ingelaere

Inside Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Seeking justice after genocide

11.15 – 11.50

Aggee Shyaka Mugabe

Reconciliation in the aftermath of genocide in Rwanda: Key challenges currently faced

11.50 – 12.25

Theoneste Rutaysire

Living under the shadow of génocidaire parents in Rwanda: The impact of ambiguous loss on children in relation to their family and community

 

 

 

12.25 - 13.00

Grace Leksana and Martijn Eickhoff

Unofficial memory culture in post-1965 Indonesia

 

13.00 – 14.00

Lunch

Film The Mute's Soliloquy 

14.00 – 14.35

Saskia Wieringa

Commemorating the Indonesian genocide: The third generation and the website ‘Ingat 65’ (Remember 1965)

14.35– 15.10

Lidewyde Berckmoes

How legacies of genocide are transmitted in the family environment

15.10 - 15.45

Emmanuel Sarabwe

Disturbed family dynamics in post-genocide Rwanda and its trickle down effects on the next generation in terms of reconciliation

 

 

 

15.45 – 16.20

Annemiek Richters

The transmission of traumatic memories of Rwandan female survivors of genocide rape to their offspring and children's responses

16.20 – 16.55

 Discussion

 

16.55 – 17.00

Closure

Saskia Wieringa

See for abstracts of the presentations and short biographic information about the chair and presenters

Due to limited spaces registration is required. Please register with mentioning your name, email address and affiliation/organisation

Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)
Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)

Room University of Amsterdam, Roeterseiland, Room C0.01

Nieuwe Achtergracht 166
1018 WV Amsterdam